September 11, 2011

No-Knead Artisan Bread

Posted by Laura


Water, flour, yeast, salt. That's it! The only ingredients needed to make your own no-knead crusty white artisan bread without laboring for hours (and costing a mere $0.50 per loaf, roughly).  Click here for the official recipe from King Arthur's Baking Blog.

What is artisan bread? The term artisan essentially refers to the baker and the process, rather than the actual type of bread. Artisan bread is homemade bread, not mass manufactured.

No-Knead Artisan Bread



Ingredients:
-3 cups lukewarm water
-6 1/2 cups flour
-1 1/2 Tablespoons instant yeast
-1 Tablespoon salt
-Stand-up Mixer (or a Bowl and Wooden Spoon)
-Dough Rising Bucket (not necessary, but helpful)


1. Mix ingredients until blended, about 30 seconds on medium speed. If mixing by hand, it will take about 2 minutes with a wooden spoon.




I love my Kitchen Aid, especially because
I can make funny faces in it :)

2. Let the dough rise at room temperature for 2 hours in a dough rising bucket (or a bowl covered with saran wrap). It should double in size. If you're pressed for time, you can skip this step.


(note: this photo is made with the recipe half'ed)

3.Next, refrigerate the dough for a minimum of 2 hours and maximum of 7 days. The longer it sits, the more sourdoughy it becomes. I love that it can stay in the fridge for so long because it means I can grab a chunk and bake it when needed.

4. When ready to bake, flour your hands and work a softball sized chunk of dough into a loaf. Place it onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (or cornmeal) and sprinkled with flour. Then, sprinkle the top of loaf with flour to secure moisture. Let rise for 60 minutes and preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

5. Right before putting the bread in the oven, make three slits on the top of the loaf with a sharp knife. Fill an oven proof dish with 1 cup of boiling water and place on bottom rack in oven. Bake the bread at 450 degrees for 25-35 minutes, until the top is golden brown. Enjoy!




This bread is great in so many ways. I love that I can keep dough in the fridge and grab a chunk when ready. I love that I can bake this bread without laboring. I love that I can shape this dough into any shape I want. My admiration for this bread is endless! Also, try mixing artisan bread topping or everything bagel topping into the dough for a different flavor. To boost up the nutrition, add a Tablespoon of wheat germ to the dough.

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Recipe for Easy Printing

No-Knead Artisan Bread

Ingredients:
-3 cups lukewarm water
-6 1/2 cups flour
-1 1/2 Tablespoons instant yeast (equivalent to 2 packets of yeast)
-1 Tablespoon salt

Directions:
1. Mix ingredients in stand-up mixer until blended, about 30 seconds on medium speed. If mixing by hand, it will take about 2 minutes with a wooden spoon.

2. Let the dough rise at room temperature for 2 hours in a dough rising bucket (or a bowl covered with saran wrap). It should double in size. If you're pressed for time, you can skip this step.

3.Next, refrigerate the dough for a minimum of 2 hours and maximum of 7 days. The longer it sits, the more sourdoughy it becomes.

4. When ready to bake, flour your hands and work a softball sized chunk of dough into a loaf. Place it onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (or cornmeal) and sprinkled with flour. Then, sprinkle the top of loaf with flour to secure moisture. Let rise for 60 minutes and preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

5. Right before putting the bread in the oven, make three slits on the top of the loaf with a sharp knife. Fill an oven proof dish with 1 cup of boiling water and place on bottom rack in oven. Bake the bread at 450 degrees for 25-35 minutes, until the top is golden brown. Enjoy!


8 comments:

  1. I can attest to the tastiness of this bread!!

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  2. You might be surprised how your blog "gets around." I received this recipe in the Mid Atlantic states via Facebook from a long time friend who moved to Hawaii years ago! She loves it and now I am dying to try it, too! Love that you can grab a chunk of dough and bake it anytime. So wonderful to have fresh hot bread anytime you want it! Thanks!

    Sue from Smithville

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    Replies
    1. It's ME! I'm the friend who moved to Maui, right? Hello! I know you'll love this recipe. Don't even bother getting the Kitchen Aid out - just a big bowl, wooden spoon, and plastic wrap. No clean up needed till you take the dough out to bake. I add a little oil to my dough (don't see it listed in the ingredients, and it really works fine either way), and I try different flours - spelt, some ground rolled oats, flax seeds - whole or ground - rye flour, whole wheat - for the heartier grains, letting them sit overnight at least (in fridge) is important to soften up the bran. Also - you have to adjust the liquid a bit, depending on your humidity. I need less here than I needed in wintery Vermont. Go for a stiff but not dry dough. Hope you try it soon!

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    2. Felicity, I'm so glad you've had success with your experiments! Have you tried it with White Whole Wheat flour? I'm want to try it but really don't want to waste the flour if it doesn't come out right (the little bag from King Arthur was quite costly).
      -L

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  3. We're so glad you stopped by for a visit :)

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  4. Laura, I go to church with your mom. She shared your blog with me. I started home schooling my ten year old this week and we made this bread together. It is wonderful! And he was thrilled with his accomplishment. : ). Thanks!

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  5. Hi Wendy, thanks for visiting. I'm glad you enjoyed the bread!
    -Laura

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  6. I used about 1/3 spelt flour (high protein, lower gluten, great flour), 1/3 ground (blenderized) whole oats, and the rest unbleached white. It came out just fine. My loaves have been a bit too flat - guess I need just a little more flour in the mix.

    I decided that since your recipe yields a lot of bread, I'll bake half of it, and leave the rest to age in the fridge a few more days - towards sour. Will make bake that loaf tomorrow, as the first one is about gone. I think I'll also try an olive loaf - add some olive oil and some sliced black olives. This is truly the best trecipe since - well, sliced bread! : )

    Felicity

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